Exploiting Copyrights: Seeking New Avenues for Songs

In the music business, exploitation is a good thing that's done many different ways. Receiving hit-making radio air play for current singles and selling millions of new records are merely two avenues for getting music out there. Other means of exploiting songs help artists and writers in their burgeoning careers, keep veterans in the public eye, and bring increased revenue and prestige to publishing, as well as recording companies. In the music business, exploitation is a good thing that's done many different ways. Receiving hit-making radio air play for current singles and selling millions of new records are merely two avenues for getting music out there. Other means of exploiting songs help artists and writers in their burgeoning careers, keep veterans in the public eye, and bring increased revenue and prestige to publishing, as well as recording companies. For instance, Dianne Warren was named ASCAP's Pop Songwriter of the Year for the fifth year in a row, winning that award and several others for herself and her publishing company, RealSongs, at least partially due to her popular song, "How Do I Live" (Trisha Yearwood sang it for the movie, Con Air). Besides films, other means of exploiting songs include getting…

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