Seaforth’s Brotherly Connection Results in Yet Another Catchy Song “Talk About”

If you write long enough, you will have one of those days. Days in which the words don’t come and the stanzas don’t fit together, and you need to lean on something to get the creative juices flowing once again.

And in those moments, Seaforth turns to just one thing.

“It’s called a random phrase generator,” chuckles Mitch Thompson, one half of Australian country duo Seaforth. “It helps when you are in a pinch.”

And yes, Thompson and fellow Seaforth bandmate Tom Jordan were indeed in a pinch in that writing room two years ago. And while they had a catchy melody that day that would eventually turn into their current single “Talk About,” they were having a bit of trouble finding the words to go along to the music.

“We threw it in the generator and ‘a lot to talk about’ spit out and we thought there was a story there,” recalls Thompson, who co-wrote the song with Jordan along with fellow songwriters Jordan Schmidt and Andy Albert. “Nothing earth shattering. Nothing you need a thesaurus for. Just real feelings put to a playful melody.”

And the rest is history.

“I remember that we had just put out our first two songs and we were just really hyped about the future,” remembers Jordan, who began playing the guitar at just ten years old. “We were on our way to finding our own lane sonically and discovering unique ways to tell our story.”

Of course, little did they know that the day that they wrote “Talk About” would be very different from the date it was released this past September.

“There was some major emotions put into the writing of that song, because I was seeing a girl and that’s exactly where I was in our relationship,” remembers Thompson. “Two years later, I’m totally in a different place.”

He pauses.

“We were also experiencing the U.S. for the first time back then and we were trying to take in everything and get as much out as possible.”

Add that to the fact that the world currently finds itself in the midst of a pandemic, and the lighthearted feel of their current single certainly is a welcome sound to hurting hearts.

“The song just has a playful feel to it,” explains Jordan. “There is an energy there. It gets your head moving. The song really came to life so well. I was so glad we were able to capture the energy of the song.”

Currently serving as the follow-up single to their sappy yet sensational “Everything Falls for You,” Seaforth finds themselves enjoying being smack in the middle of a blossoming career that has captured the attention of even the most discriminating critics. And yes, “Talk Again” is yet another example of what this country duo does best…and that’s work off one another in the writing room.

“We have this sort of brotherly energy,” explains Thompson, who collaborated with his Seaforth bandmate and Mitchell Tenpenny for the addictive “Anything She Says” earlier this year. “We are on the same page with a lot of things, but especially when it comes to our writing. We always seem to thrive on the melodies first. We engage in the emotion of the music before we go into the lyrics. We go from the ground up. We go with the emotion of it before we figure out what we want to say.”

“We both bring something different to the table,” adds Jordan. “Melodically, Mitch is super gifted and unique when it comes to his approach to songwriting. It can take me 25-30 minutes to find the right melody, but I have always been this hyper musical person. Just totally obsessed with playing. With that combination of knowledge, we definitely compliment each other.”

Granted, the two agree that at the beginning of the pandemic, the duo who had been busy sharing the stage with everyone from Keith Urban to Kane Brown to Brett Young up until that point did experience their share of writer’s block.

“We were in Europe for a festival when everything was shut down, so we came home and for four months, we didn’t create a thing,” Thompson remembers. “But the last two months, we have totally gone full stream.”

“We are definitely exploring new sounds and avenues,” concludes Jordan. “We are constantly trying to find the best way to bring our own personal feelings out in the song so it can relate to people.”

It’s almost therapeutic, isn’t it?

“You get it out on paper, and then you move on.”

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