GLASVEGAS > Glasvegas

In the midst of a noise-pop resurgence (See: A Place to Bury Strangers’ self-titled debut, The Magnetic Fields’ Distortion, The Raveonettes’ Lust Lust Lust, etc.), Glasvegas released two well-received singles: “Daddy’s Gone” and “It’s My Own Cheating Heart That Makes Me Cry.” The Scottish indie rock quartet got people’s attention for pairing the sonic grandeur of Jesus and Mary Chain with ‘50s doo-wop and rockabilly.

Label: COLUMBIA
[Rating: 2 STARS]









In the midst of a noise-pop resurgence (See: A Place to Bury Strangers’ self-titled debut, The Magnetic Fields’ Distortion, The Raveonettes’ Lust Lust Lust, etc.), Glasvegas released two well-received singles: “Daddy’s Gone” and “It’s My Own Cheating Heart That Makes Me Cry.” The Scottish indie rock quartet got people’s attention for pairing the sonic grandeur of Jesus and Mary Chain with ‘50s doo-wop and rockabilly. Produced by Rich Costey (Interpol, Mars Volta), the band’s melodramatic debut doesn’t live up to the hype. Album opener “Flowers and Football Tops” seems promising as singer James Allen wields his exaggerated Glasgow-ian drawl around the word “baby” with ease and charm. While his voice is affecting, at times, his baby-pool lyrics (“liar liar pants on fire”) prove shallow and unimaginative, thus killing the mood the band tries so hard to create. It’s easy to want to like them, but, in the end, Glasvegas is all noise and no soul. The album keeps you interested only in the hope that something wonderful is on the verge of happening, but unfortunately, it never does. Their inability to dig deep and truly resonate with listeners might keep this Next Big Thing merely on the verge as well.


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