Rostam Announces Two-Part ‘Changephobia’ Remix Album, Drops New Version of “Kinney” with A. G. Cook

On Tuesday (Nov. 2), former-Vampire Weekend member, Rostam, unveiled plans to roll out a two-part remix project for his most recent solo record, Changephobia. Part one of the project—featuring A. G. Cook, A. K. Paul, and Billy Lemos—dropped today (November 2).

The lead single from this first batch of reworks is a version of “Kinney” produced by Cook, the innovating producer and label-head behind the electronic label that laid the groundwork for the ongoing hyper pop explosion, PC Music. 

With Cook’s signature “extreme” style—featuring a flurry of thundering drums, ethereal vocal editing, and swirling synths—the new version of “Kinney” demonstrates the creative potential of these kinds of collaborations, bringing together minds from two distinct, yet equally impactful, camps in pop music. Hearing the personalized tact of Rostam’s melodies paired with the zeitgeist-capturing touch of Cook’s production, the end result is something magnificent, where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

Speaking with American Songwriter earlier this year, Rostam explained how his process unfolds over a lengthy period of time—starting with voice memos of instrumental compositions, he lets his ideas brew for a while before finding the right melodies and lyrics for them. Considering this, the remix record represents a cool epilogue in the creative endeavor—no longer his sole work, the songs can be reimagined and thrust into new lives. 

The second half of the remix project—featuring Easyfun, Japanese Wallpaper, Ben Bohmer, and ROTH BART BARON—is due on December 2.


Part I of the remixes for Rostam’s Changephobia is out now and available everywhere—watch the lyric video for “Kinney” remixed by A. G. Cook below:

Rostam by Jubilee (courtesy of Motor Mouth Media)

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