Bringin’ it Backwards: Interview with The Besnard Lakes

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We had the pleasure of interviewing The Besnard Lakes over Zoom video!

The Besnard Lakes have passed through death and they’re here to tell the tale. Nearly five years after their last lightning-tinted volley, the magisterial Montreal psych-rock band have sworn off compromise, split with their long-standing label, and completed a searing, 72-minute suite about the darkness of dying and the light on the other side.

The Besnard Lakes Are The Last of the Great Thunderstorm  Warnings is the group’s sixth album and the first in more than 15 years to be released away from a certain midwestern American indie record company. After 2016’s A Coliseum  Complex Museum – which saw Jace Lasek and Olga Goreas attempting shorter, less sprawling songs – the Besnards and their label decided it was time to go their separate ways;  with that decision came a question of whether to even continue the project at all.

Ignited by their love for each other, and for playing music together, the sextet found themselves unspooling the most uncompromising recording of their career. Despite all its grandeur. The  Last of the Great Thunderstorm Warnings honours the very essence of punk rock: the notion that a band need only be relevant to itself. At last the Besnard Lake have crafted a continuous long-form suite: nine tracks that could be listened together as one, like Spiritualized’s Lazer Guided  Melodies or even Dark Side of the Moon, overflowing with melody and harmony, drone and dazzle, the group’s own unique weather.

Here now, the Besnard Lakes finally dispensed with the two/three-year album cycle, taking all the time they needed to conceive, compose, record and mix their opus. Some of its songs were old, resurrected from demos cast aside years ago. Others were literally woodshedded in the cabanon behind Lasek and Goreas’s “Rigaud Ranch” – invented and reinvented, relishing this rougher sound.

The Besnard Lakes Are The  Last of the Great Thunderstorm Warnings is a double LP. “Near Death” is the title of the first side. “Death,”  “After Death,” and “Life” follow next. It’s literally a  journey into (and back from) the brink: the story of the  Besnard Lakes’ own odyssey but also a remembrance of others’, especially the death of Lasek’s father in 2019.

Being on your deathbed is perhaps the most psychedelic trip  you can go on: in Lasek’s father’s case, he surfaced from a  morphine dream to talk about “a window” on his blanket, with “a carpenter inside, making intricate objects.” That experience pervades the album, catching fire on the song  “Christmas Can Wait”; elsewhere the band pays tribute to the late Mark Hollis and, on “The Father of Time Wake Up,”  they mourn the death of Prince.

In late 2020, as the world burns, there might be nothing less trendy than an hour-long psych-rock epic by a band of  Canadian grandmasters. Then again, there might be nothing we need more.

We want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com.

www.BringinitBackwards.com

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