Dolly Parton Asks Legislature to Remove Bill For Statue of Her Likeness at Tennessee State Capitol

Dolly Parton is saying, “Thank you, but no thank you” to legislation, proposed by Tennessee State Representative John Windle (D-Livingston), requesting a statue be erected of her likeness. The bill, which unanimously passed on Tuesday, February 9, asks for the Dolly statue to be placed in the Tennessee State Capitol Building in Nashville.

However, Dolly has a different idea. The Grammy-award winner doesn’t believe that now is the right time for the honor and has asked that the bill to be removed.

In post on Twitter, Dolly shared her comments:

“I want to thank the Tennessee legislature for their consideration of a bill to erect a statue of me on the Capitol grounds. I am honored and humbled by their intention but I have to asked [sic] the leaders of the state legislature to remove the bill from any and all consideration.”

She continued, “Give all that is going on in the world, I don’t think putting me on a pedestal is appropriate at this time. I hope, though, that somewhere down the road several years from now or perhaps after I’m gone if you still feel I deserve it, then I’m certain I will stand proud in our great State Capitol as a grateful Tennessean.”

The post concludes, “In the meantime, I’ll continue to try to do good work to make this great state proud.”

The statue, financed by gifts and private donations, gained traction in January after a bill was proposed. A change.org petition was established in support of the legislation, favoring a Dolly statue over those of confederate soldiers.

“Tennessee is littered with statues memorializing confederate officers. History should not be forgotten, but we need not glamorize those who do not deserve our praise. Instead, let us honor a true Tennessee hero, Dolly Parton,” the petition notes.

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