Book Review: The Band: Pioneers of Americana Music

-

book The Band
The Band: Pioneers of Americana Music
By Craig Harris
(Rowman & Littlefield)

When The Band released its debut album, Music From Big Pink, in 1968, their impact on other musicians was huge. Musicians on both sides of the Atlantic, including The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton and The Grateful Dead took notice and started returning to a more roots-oriented sound.

What The Band did was meld rock and roll, blues, R&B, gospel, traditional country and honky tonk, turn it inside out, and create a sound that was totally their own.

All were accomplished musicians, with three really good and very different singers. Onstage they were incredibly precise and one of the few groups that could duplicate what they did in the studio. Their concerts were no-nonsense affairs. It was all about the music.

The group, comprising one American and four Canadians, had come together as The Hawks, the backup band for rockabilly singer Ronnie Hawkins. Hawkins was from Arkansas, as was drummer Levon Helm, who joined The Hawks after graduating from high school in the ’50s. A relatively minor figure in America, Hawkins was big in Canada where the gigs were plentiful. Hawkins’ band also served as a training ground for musicians, much the way Muddy Waters’ band did for blues and Bill Monroe’s did for bluegrass. A lot of great musicians such as Roy Buchanan passed through the Hawks. Robbie Robertson was first to join, followed by Rick Danko, Richard Manuel and Garth Hudson. Hawkins, however, was a stern taskmaster with a lot of rules, and eventually the group that became known as The Band struck out on their own, usually as Levon & The Hawks, but also the Canadian Squires. They became one of the most legendary and explosive bar bands in Toronto while even occasionally venturing into the United States.

Craig Harris’ book is the third major book on The Band, the other two being Barney Hoskyn’s Across The Great Divide and Levon Helm’s autobiography, This Wheel’s On Fire. At times the book is riveting, particularly the interviews with various group members about their beginnings, and also the period before and after The Last Waltz.

However, the book is also riddled with wrong names and facts, errors in continuity, and numerous other contradictions.

After a brief opening chapter about Tour ’74, Dylan’s reunion tour with The Band that was also his return to touring after an eight year layoff (with a few sporadic appearances), Harris goes into a detailed history of the folk movement, going all the way back to labor organizer/songwriter Joe Hill. During this history, he mentions the song, originally a poem by Alfred Hayes set to music by Earl Robinson, “I Dreamed I Saw Joe Hill Last Night,” and suddenly the book switches to 1969 to Joan Baez singing it at the Woodstock Festival. The point is, if you’re going to delve into that kind of history, then mention the man who first made the song famous, namely Paul Robeson, who recorded it on the album Songs of Free Men for Columbia Records in 1942.

During this history of folk music, Pete Seeger talks about the night he met Woody Guthrie at a midnight benefit concert for agricultural workers. At the concert was a square dance troupe of which Seeger’s future wife was a member. The leader of the troupe was Margot Mayo. Harris calls her Margo Meyer. Mentioning the group The Weavers who were blacklisted in the ’50s, and talking about their 1955 reunion concert at Carnegie Hall, Harris says they signed to Folkways Records. Wrong!

The label was Vanguard, and the reason this is important is that album, The Weavers At Carnegie Hall was pretty much Vanguard’s entry into folk music (they were a classical label).  Vanguard would become a major folk label in the ’60s, and explore Chicago blues with a three-disc compilation in addition to albums by Junior Wells, Buddy Guy and others. The purpose of all this folk music history of course is it leads to Bob Dylan. It should not be hard to get the details right.

Levon Helm And Songwriting: Robbie Roberston and Larry Campbell Weigh In

There are no footnotes in the book. This means that unless Harris qualified a quote, you never know whether you’re reading an interview Harris conducted on his own or someone else’s. Harris does provide a lengthy list of acknowledgments in the beginning of the book. Reading the acknowledgments, I was surprised, gratified, curious, and ultimately mystified to see my name. I’ve written about The Band and interviewed both Danko and Helm, but was never contacted to use those interviews. I also noticed the name of a friend of mine, another music journalist, that was spelled wrong.

I immediately looked in the index to see what was used, but my name wasn’t listed. Finally, I came across my name on page 125. The problem is Harris says it’s from an interview I did in 1999. It is not my quote! I interviewed Rick Danko on his first solo tour in 1977. Later on, Harris quotes from my review of Helm’s album Dirt Farmer. The quotes are accurate, but he takes various lines from various parts of the review and puts them all together in one paragraph as if they were one.

More problems: One of the first people whom various members of The Hawks recorded with was blues singer John Hammond (Jr.). In 1964, Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson, and Garth Hudson joined Hammond on his album, So Many Roads. Also on the session was Michael Bloomfield (playing piano) and Charlie Musselwhite on harp. The album was released in the spring of 1965. This was the first I heard, not only of the guys who would become The Band, but also of Bloomfield and Musselwhite. A few months later when I saw Robertson and Helm (and five weeks later the entire Hawks) back Bob Dylan, my reaction was, “Oh, the guys from the Hammond album.”

In 1965, Robertson and Rick Danko would record another album with Hammond, I Can Tell. Harris says they recorded So Many Roads after playing with Dylan and he also mixes the two albums together! He also says it was intended to be Hammond’s debut. Hammond’s debut album was released by Vanguard Records in 1963. So Many Roads was his third released album followed by an album called Country Blues also released in 1965 that was actually recorded first. (Every discography on the internet has this information wrong.) I Can Tell was eventually released on Atlantic Records in 1967. The album was produced by Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller for their label Redbird. Redbird folded before the album was released, and the album was eventually picked up by Atlantic. Harris says Lieber and Stoller rejected the record. They didn’t reject it – they produced it. I interviewed John Hammond in 1977, and have him on tape saying this. So Many Roads was one of the first examples of young white musicians playing Chicago blues, and it led a lot of people to the music of Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed, Otis Rush and other blues greats. It’s also important because on this record you can hear the beginnings of the sound Bob Dylan would get onstage with the Hawks in the fall of 1965 and the first five months of 1966.

Harris also delves into the songwriting royalties feud between Levon Helm and Robbie Robertson early in the book while writing about Music From Big Pink. In the real world, Robbie Robertson did what every other songwriter in every other band at the time did, whether it was Lennon and McCartney, Jagger and Richards, Brian Wilson, John Sebastian, Ray Davies or Lowell George. And it’s not like there aren’t shared credits on albums by The Band. Richard Manuel wrote three songs on the first album, and I’m sure the rest of the Band contributed to those songs, but they never get mentioned. Either way, you can’t say, as Harris does in talking about “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” that “Co-writer Helm guided Robertson in his preparations for writing the song.” I’m sorry, but taking somebody to the library to look up books on the Civil War or telling them about the South is not co-writing a song. Then, after all this, a few chapters later in talking about the post-Last Waltz Band returning to recording in the ’90s, Harris says, “Without Robertson’s input, however, new material proved evasive.”

There are innumerable other problems with this book, from not knowing what songs Richard Manuel sang to saying that the Staple Singers and Emmylou Harris appeared at The Last Waltz. They were in the movie, but were not at the concert. The venue where The Last Waltz took place is also wrong in the book. The show took place at Winterland, not Wonderland.

Dogged by factual errors throughout, Harris’ book also never really delves into The Band’s influence on what is called Americana Music. Maybe if Harris had had a knowledgeable editor and proofreader, this book would be worthwhile. Clearly, he didn’t. As it stands, there are too many things wrong for this book to be close to credible. The problem is some kid who wants to know about music is going to pick it up and think it’s the truth.

 

24 COMMENTS

  1. That’s a very good and thorough review of an obviously flawed book. There are a lot of factual errors just in the few passages mentioned and, in this day and age, a lack of correctly cited sources and a bibliography is unconscionable. Still, perhaps complaints from knowledgeable readers and critics will force a rewrite/retooling! Revisionist history and slack research have no place in this information-rich era. And this particular musical history deserves the best. The Band and its antecedents are VERY important to an understanding of the then zeitgeist and cultural changes which led to a deeper appreciation of Americana.

    • Every member of The Band was flawed. No one is questioning the importance of getting things right, not even Craig! This is far from slack research, and may I ask, have you even read the book for yourself yet? Until you do that, don’t say obviously flawed, because you don’t know from reading what some other guy wrote any more than what I said in my review.

    • Here is how Anna’s Levon Daily sees it:

      Until about a month ago, I didn’t know who Craig Harris even was, let alone that he was writing a book about The Band. Only real Band fans can truly appreciate the gravity of knowing that such a thing exists. I got mine today, and I could not put it down. I thought I knew a lot about The Band and I did. After reading this book, I know much more. It is obviously written by a true fan, and will be much appreciated by legions of other fans who love this music. All his first editions are already sold out.

      I found his story a wonderful addition to things I already knew, while filling in gaps that I didn’t realize existed until today. It’s a page turner. It’s also historically sound, and amazing in its scope. He tells of the dreams and aspirations of each player, and how many were realized. The research alone is vast. Any new comprehensive book about The Band has to be, and this is like an encyclopedia of the roots of this pioneering music.

      This book contains the story of the birth of so many dreams my head was spinning. If you are a fan of The Band during their entire history, this book is a must read. It is obviously lovingly handled and explained beautifully, a story told from all kinds of sources in a format I long for most days, a BOOK! It harkens back to when I was breathlessly waiting for every Rolling Stone, snuck my brother’s High Times, and immersed myself in the music to the extent that I did. I also wrote concert reviews, naturally learning to play close attention to everything in print about music. I find out I am not alone in my manic pursuit of the details and stories about this magical ensemble.

      Because of my personal knowledge, I knew many of the stories, and Craig’s sources for the information because they were the same as mine. And millions of Band fans will feel the same. But this is much more, and the glorious feeling of knowing more about my beloved Band and Levon Helm makes me feel like a kid who still hungers for the music news in print. It evokes that feel in the book as well. Names are named and connections are made clear.

      I thought I knew a lot about The Band, and I do, especially Levon. Craig’s book lays out the history in reverent admiration that is genuine and reflects sentiments of the masses of nameless fans who feel the same way. One of my favorite passages discusses the relationship between Levon and Amy Helm as he struggled through chemo, and her selfless devotion to her dad is made crystal clear. Also, the joy Levon got from the realization of his dream of having the Rambles is clearly present, while also devoting equal, fair, and unbiased reporting about all the original members. The facts and history are painstakingly told in such a great way to help keep Levon’s spirit alive and well, along with Rick and Richard. This book will be one that The Angel Band would applaud.

    • It is not so much being “riveted” more than just excited to have the book and read all the stories in one place. It is unbiased, and shows what RR did prior to The Last Waltz, and contains information not available. Above all, it is a FAN’S book, and not written to be dissected because of the messenger. I loved the book. First editions always contain blemishes that can be fixed before it goes back to print. There are only 500 books out there that the corrections are not included. From now on out, all books will reflect the corrections! This is NOT uncommon. My review stands as a fan.

      • For the record, every time someone keeps pasting in my first review, they post again and say it is my revised review on the revisions of the 2nd printing. Since that is not even available to the public yet, my original post says nothing about the corrections being made, and as one responder said, perhaps the book will be better because fans and those in the know who read his pre-release first printing of just 500 copies has brought these things to light, and the 2nd printing WILL reflect those changes. I feel great that I was able to read a copy of the first edition, because I DID point out a couple things to Craig as I found them to be incorrect as well! My “review” will be seen by many people as full of enthusiasm and joy of just listening to the music, not nit-picking the first edition to death and trying to kill the book before the revised copies even get to see the light of day. That is just not fair to Craig Harris. He wrote a great book that fans will love, and fans like me everywhere will see for OURSELVES what we think about the book as a whole. It is ironic that your hangups about his book are ALL about who gets the credit for what song, or naming the reporter who wrote the review in the first place and is now not even mentioned, Peter.

        I know that you have followed Anna’s Levon Daily for some time now, and you know that as a Levon fan, I am done arguing about songwriting rights. I don’t care what you say about RR doing what everyone else was doing and protecting his own interests – the fact remains that it is exactly what he did. That still doesn’t make it RIGHT. You go from bitching about his chronology and basic typos to trashing his entire book, discouraging so many people from enjoying the book for themselves, it’s a shame.

        I get that you want to make money writing, but now it is clear that you yourself are planning on coming out with your own book, so way to trash Craig Harris for beating you to the punch. Your dismissive attitude about his book makes your lousy, thumbs down of a review look more like an attempt to discredit his book so you can publish something of your own. This is a big world, there are millions of fans, there is room for more than one book.

        Just like there is more than one fan page. Levon is like Elvis. He belongs to all of us, in our memories and stories that all of us have seen on Youtube and onliine. It is a different world than it was when The Band was in it’s heyday, technology is a drag for older fans to master. Many don’t share the geek like copy editing skills fascination like I (and obviously YOU) do. I enjoyed the book, and wrote what I did as a fan. Craig didn’t ask me to post one word. Ever. Anywhere. I wrote what I wrote on my own Levon fan site, and that is where you ripped my “review” and pasted it in here. Talk about not cool.

        • Thought your readers might be interested in another review of your article. This one if from Levon’s old friends, Happy Traum himself. He writes of Craig’s Book and says:

          Craig Harris has an obvious passion for Americana music in general, and for The Band in particular. This detailed account of one of our most iconic musical entities, and the scene that surrounded them, should be on the shelf of every fan of American roots music.

          (Happy Traum, guitarist, performer, owner of Homespun Music Instruction, Woodstock, NY)

          “I saw that Happy had added his review on Craig Harris’ book in the editorial section. In case you didn’t see it, I thought I would post it here: If Happy gives it a thumbs up, and I do, and many others, I am NOT ALONE in my thinking when I got involved. This IS sacred ground, and Peter, pick on someone your “own” your narcissistic and self-important meanderings because you plan to write a book, too. Just admit it already! Confession is good for the soul. Your major problem is standing on the wrong side of history. And you claim to be such an expert!

          Maybe next time, you will not drag me into it. Unless of course, you would like to tell Happy Traum that his review (that said virtually confirmed what I had posted on my FAN SITE. Wanna argue with Happy Traum? Please, have at it, I would pay money to see him dismantle you one piece at a time. Stop trying to hard to force things, and the teacher will appear when you are ready.

          You obviously never got that far. The book is amazing, and lots of others are enjoying it, sorry that you chose to slam it, making it look amateurish. You could not be further from the truth. I think I trust Happy over you and RR sickening attempt at a last power publicity stunt.

          Alas, that too turned out to be a lie. And on one of the main questions on Band fans of Levon’s who thought it odd to show up at the Hospital with an entourage and gave the impression that the two spoke, This is just simply not true! Levon was in a coma when RR got there, and in my opinion, RR used it as a publicity stunt.

          If Levon had one ounce of strength in his body, he would have jumped up and kicked RR ass! Not sure how it came to happen, but you can bet money that RR had an agenda, and he was there to “make amends” with his “old friend” who MADE him into RR, and taught him the music he was so mesmerized about. This was no accident.

          I hope you read the revised copy of the book and see the changes have made a good book, GREAT! As for you, even if you wrote a mindblowing book about Levon or The Band, you should remember the dedication and deep devotion to Levon Helm, the REAL founder of this sound and band.

          Period, I am tired of hearing about you, I would appreciate it if you would stop slamming me, I have never done anything to you! Bottom line, I can say whatever I want to about any of this. We did just that. Many people chimed in with updated information, that is what Craig’s book does. He sets up each scene and what happened, and I still REALLY love it. So will OTHER Band fans!

    • And there it is… yes, Peter, when you gonna write YOUR book???? I have no doubt it will be SECOND to Craig’s work. Fans don’t want to be fact checked to death like an encyclopedia entry, they want to feel the stories come to life and reflect on a nostalgic time. Peter, good luck with that.

  2. An open
    letter to Peter Stone Brown (and the readers of American Songwriter):

    Thank
    you for your perceptive review of my book, The
    Band: Pioneers of Americana Music. Appropriate changes ensure that future
    printings will reflect accuracy.

    Someone once pointed out that
    typos hide before publication and scream afterwards – the absence of an
    apostrophe (Hays’s), the addition of an “s” at the end of Levon Helm’s name, or
    failing to acknowledge Paul Robeson’s earth-shattering rendition of “I Dreamed
    I Saw Joe Hill Last Night.” My placing Richard Manuel’s birthplace in
    Stratford, Oregon rather than Ottawa was the result of brain freeze. Despite
    strenuous reviewing, and revising, by Rowman & Littlefield editors, and me,
    none of us caught it. Your detailed explanation regarding John Hammond, Jr. was clarifying.
    As for asking your permission to quote from one of your interviews, we should not forget that it is the message, and not the medium, that is important. A celebrity’s words are not copyright-able. There are several reasons for this. One is the Fair Use doctrine – the public has the right to know what a public figure has to say. The other is that you cannot copyright the truth. It is a fact that someone said something to somebody, whether credit is given or not. The words between quotes are the opinions of the writer – the creative part of the article – and are indeed copyright-protected, but the words of a public figure are not. Bringing together all available material and brewing a unique interpretation is research. I apologize, however, for incorrectly crediting a quote to one of your interviews. It has changed to “once told a reporter.”
    Your input has helped to strengthen my book, and future readers, and I, am in your gratitude. With the suggested corrections made, and an extremely complex story further unraveled, I hope that you will re-evaluate what I have written. Thank you!

    • Did Levon co-write Lonesome Suzy?

      I’ve heard a lot of weird stuff about this book, but claiming that Levon was a co-writer because he “guided Robertson” is laughable. You’d have hundreds of names on the cover of your book if such was true.

      A supposed history with no footnotes? Lame.

      • Hearing about it through the grapevine cannot replace reading the book yourself and coming to your own conclusions. Have you ever written a book? Also, back off of Levon of all people. He was the engine that ran The Band Train. No one wanted things right more than Levon, and you can’t write about shit until you read the book.

  3. and here is a contrasting view from Anna’s Levon Daily:

    Until about a month ago, I didn’t know who Craig Harris even was, let alone that he was writing a book about The Band. Only real Band fans can truly appreciate the gravity of knowing that such a thing exists. I got mine today, and I could not put it down. I thought I knew a lot about The Band and I did. After reading this book, I know much more. It is obviously written by a true fan, and will be much appreciated by legions of other fans who love this music. All his first editions are already sold out.

    I found his story a wonderful addition to things I already knew, while filling in gaps that I didn’t realize existed until today. It’s a page turner. It’s also historically sound, and amazing in its scope. He tells of the dreams and aspirations of each player, and how many were realized. The research alone is vast. Any new comprehensive book about The Band has to be, and this is like an encyclopedia of the roots of this pioneering music.

    This book contains the story of the birth of so many dreams my head was spinning. If you are a fan of The Band during their entire history, this book is a must read. It is obviously lovingly handled and explained beautifully, a story told from all kinds of sources in a format I long for most days, a BOOK! It harkens back to when I was breathlessly waiting for every Rolling Stone, snuck my brother’s High Times, and immersed myself in the music to the extent that I did. I also wrote concert reviews, naturally learning to play close attention to everything in print about music. I find out I am not alone in my manic pursuit of the details and stories about this magical ensemble.

    Because of my personal knowledge, I knew many of the stories, and Craig’s sources for the information because they were the same as mine. And millions of Band fans will feel the same. But this is much more, and the glorious feeling of knowing more about my beloved Band and Levon Helm makes me feel like a kid who still hungers for the music news in print. It evokes that feel in the book as well. Names are named and connections are made clear.

    I thought I knew a lot about The Band, and I do, especially Levon. Craig’s book lays out the history in reverent admiration that is genuine and reflects sentiments of the masses of nameless fans who feel the same way. One of my favorite passages discusses the relationship between Levon and Amy Helm as he struggled through chemo, and her selfless devotion to her dad is made crystal clear. Also, the joy Levon got from the realization of his dream of having the Rambles is clearly present, while also devoting equal, fair, and unbiased reporting about all the original members. The facts and history are painstakingly told in such a great way to help keep Levon’s spirit alive and well, along with Rick and Richard. This book will be one that The Angel Band would applaud.

  4. Here is Anna’s Levon Daily’s review of the revised edition: Until about a month ago, I didn’t know who Craig Harris even was, let alone that he was writing a book about The Band. Only real Band fans can truly appreciate the gravity of knowing that such a thing exists. I got mine today, and I could not put it down. I thought I knew a lot about The Band and I did. After reading this book, I know much more. It is obviously written by a true fan, and will be much appreciated by legions of other fans who love this music. All his first editions are already sold out.

    I found his story a wonderful addition to things I already knew, while filling in gaps that I didn’t realize existed until today. It’s a page turner. It’s also historically sound, and amazing in its scope. He tells of the dreams and aspirations of each player, and how many were realized. The research alone is vast. Any new comprehensive book about The Band has to be, and this is like an encyclopedia of the roots of this pioneering music.

    This book contains the story of the birth of so many dreams my head was spinning. If you are a fan of The Band during their entire history, this book is a must read. It is obviously lovingly handled and explained beautifully, a story told from all kinds of sources in a format I long for most days, a BOOK! It harkens back to when I was breathlessly waiting for every Rolling Stone, snuck my brother’s High Times, and immersed myself in the music to the extent that I did. I also wrote concert reviews, naturally learning to play close attention to everything in print about music. I find out I am not alone in my manic pursuit of the details and stories about this magical ensemble.

    Because of my personal knowledge, I knew many of the stories, and Craig’s sources for the information because they were the same as mine. And millions of Band fans will feel the same. But this is much more, and the glorious feeling of knowing more about my beloved Band and Levon Helm makes me feel like a kid who still hungers for the music news in print. It evokes that feel in the book as well. Names are named and connections are made clear.

    I thought I knew a lot about The Band, and I do, especially Levon. Craig’s book lays out the history in reverent admiration that is genuine and reflects sentiments of the masses of nameless fans who feel the same way. One of my favorite passages discusses the relationship between Levon and Amy Helm as he struggled through chemo, and her selfless devotion to her dad is made crystal clear. Also, the joy Levon got from the realization of his dream of having the Rambles is clearly present, while also devoting equal, fair, and unbiased reporting about all the original members. The facts and history are painstakingly told in such a great way to help keep Levon’s spirit alive and well, along with Rick and Richard. This book will be one that The Angel Band would applaud.

    • Perhaps you don’t know about my own history of The Band and Levon. This review contradicts nothing, it enhances the experience of the reader to learn more about this groundbreaking music at the time it was released. NO first time releases are perfect, that is why anything that is petty and sounds like sour grapes is because Craig did this on his own, and he was the first to get his book published. That ain’t easy!

  5. Not everyone is a professional writer who will be reading the book. If I didn’t know better, I would think that you’re upset more that he published than what he said. An average fan will dig it when the corrections are in place, and he did have a copywriter. This is a small publishing house, and when I said self-published, I didn’t know all the business aspects (like most fans) but the best thing about Craig is that once he realized the problem, he (and his publisher) corrected the passage. That’s just life. I wrote my “review” totally as a fan, not a professional author or journalist. Most fans aren’t. But most fans will never see the first edition, and so wrong info will not be passed on via Craig’s book. It sounds a bit like sour grapes to me. In spite of your obvious disdain for the book, you don’t sound like a fan, you sound like someone else who wants to write a book. Have at it. Write a better one, I’ll read it, too.

  6. Let’s get something straight here. This is not a self-published book. This is a book issued by a major publishing house, Rowman & Littlefield. It’s a book that lists for $40. It’s not a blog that can be updated within minutes. It is something that people purchase expecting it to be as correct as possible, and factually and historically accurate. It is not fiction, it’s a biography and a historical account. It is an author’s duty and responsibility to get a book as correct as possible the first time before publishing. That means proofreading and fact checking, and then checking again before the book is published and sold to the public. This book has innumerable errors, grammatical errors, wrong names and wrong facts throughout the book. There’s no arguing this. It is just plain wrong. It is my job, in fact my duty to my readers as a music journalist (which by the way I’ve been for several decades) to point out that something they may be considering purchasing is a flawed product.

    • Peter, I suggest you look at the latest Amazon link for Craig Harris’ new book. For you to say in print that the book is $40 is just straight out lying to your readers. I am not a professional anything, I have a fan page that you yourself follow. I have seen you in there, a lot, dude.

      You obviously ripped my review off of my FAN PAGE for Levon Helm. When I said self-published, I didn’t know how the book publishing worked because I am not in the business of knowing all the legalities around getting your work formally published. Bottom line is, Craig obviously had to find a publishing house who must have thought it was a worthwhile venture or THEY would not have taken on his “project.”

      I didn’t seek you out to enter into my world so I could read and watch you trash Craig and ME the way you did. Talk about tactics and arguing, you BLATANTLY lied about the PRICE of the book. And AMAZON set the price, not Craig Harris! What is your fizz with me, Peter?

      If you write a review, and you want feedback you take what you get on your own website. It became a “thing” when you ripped my “review” from a NON PAID, UNBIASED, FAN of Levon Helm. It is MY DUTY to tell people like you that Levon and The Band are like the Beatles. YOU don’t own the copyright to a true lover of The Band who obviously took and immense project of this scope that you yourself say you have done for 20 years,. Let me ask you then, why am I not writing my review on YOUR book?

      You can snipe at me all day, but whatever, man. I am not trying to ruin somebody’s dream, sorry if that rained on your own little parade. If you had a book out about The Band, I would have bought it, You wrote a thumbs down review, Sometimes when I would go to a concert, I would read the reviews and wonder if the reporter had even been in the building or seen the same show as I did. Everybody has an opinion. You got paid to write this article, I DID NOT. No one pays me one dime for what I do. You are letting down your readers because you want them to read YOUR book. THEN PUBLISH IT ALREADY! And remember, you came to me, ok? YOU came to ME. Still so NOT COOL.

Popular Posts