Hints to Help You Solve Today’s Heardle: May 24

Videos by American Songwriter

Videos by American Songwriter

It’s time for more Heardle clues. Today’s track is a rock mainstay but can you guess the title from just a few seconds of listening? If not, we’re here to help jog your memory with some helpful hints.

If you need a brush-up on Heardle, the browser trivia game tests your skills at song recollection. The game will play just a few seconds of a song, it is then your job to guess the title of the track and the name of the artist. If you don’t know the song just yet, you can reveal more of the song until it comes to you. You get six chances to guess before the answer is revealed.

Below are five clues to help you get started.

5 HINTS FOR TODAY’S HEARDLE

1. This song was released in 1965 by a folk trailblazer.

2. The title of this track gets its name from a proverb despite its similarity to a certain English rock group.

3. Jimi Hendrix often covered this track live, including a famed performance at the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival.

4. This artist was awarded a Nobel Prize in Literature for “poetic expressions” in his songwriting efforts.

5. Lastly, here are a few lines from the song: “Once upon a time you dressed so fine / Threw the bums a dime in your prime, didn’t you? / People call say ‘beware doll, you’re bound to fall’ / You thought they were all kidding you

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SPOILER ALERT: TODAY’S HEARDLE ANSWER

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It’s Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone.”

Did you guess it?

Bob Dylan is widely regarded as one of the greatest songwriters of all time. His work has spanned more than 60 years and collected countless honors and accolades.

At the onset of his career, Dylan became a staunch Civil Rights and anti-war activist. Famed tracks like “The Times They Are a-Changin” and “Blowin’ in the Wind” became anthems for each movement and spurred on a new generation of activists. His lyrics during this time incorporated a range of political, social, and literary influences, breaking out of the pop music mold and blazing a trail of his own within the folk genre.

In the late 1960s, Dylan defied expectations once again, adopting electric instrumentation and leaning heavily into the rock sphere. With the new sound, Dylan released three of the most influential rock albums of the era – Bringing It All Back Home, Blonde on Blonde, and Highway 61 Revisited.

“Like a Rolling Stone” featured on the latter album, acting as a single despite its six-minute runtime. After some hesitation from radio stations, the song hit No. 2 on the US Billboard charts and expanded commercial and creative boundaries in music.

The title is in fact not a reference to The Rolling Stones but is instead taken from the proverb, “a rolling stone gathers no moss.” Dylan first got the idea from a 1949 Hank Williams song “Lost Highway,” which contains the line, “I’m a rolling stone, all alone and lost.”

Thanks to the lux rockers, the phrase is often associated with a life of glamour and excess but Williams’ song is about a homeless man paying the price for his life of sin. Dylan used the phrase similarly, saying his rolling stone is without a home, like a complete unknown.

Dylan was inducted into both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 2016, Dylan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition.”

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