In the Biggest ‘Kellyoke’ Week, Kelly Clarkson Covers Five Songs, Including Kacey Musgraves’ “Breadwinner”

Videos by American Songwriter

Videos by American Songwriter

This past week, famed country music singer Kelly Clarkson treated fans of her daytime talk show, The Kelly Clarkson Show, with not one, not two, not three, not four but FIVE “kellyoke” performances.

It’s the biggest “Kellyoke” week yet!

And the string of cover renditions included Kacey Musgraves’ hit, “Breadwinner.”

But let’s take them in order, shall we?

To start off the week on Monday (February 7), Clarkson covered the song “Arcade” by the artist Duncan Laurence, which you can see below. That emotional song preceded Tuesday’s performance of “Heartache Tonight” by The Eagles.

But wait! We’re far from through.

On Hump Day (Wednesday, February 9), Clarkson passed the mic to her guest host, Simu Liu, who took on the role of requesting a performance from the singer.

Liu, who starred in Disney’s Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings, ushered in a clip of Clarkson and her band, Y’all, performing a rendition of Coldplay’s hit song, “Viva La Vida.” Check out Clarkson’s performance of that below.

Wrapping up the week, Clarkson, who was back at her show as the host, performed two more times. In the first, she took on the lively hit “Breadwinner” by Musgraves. And to follow that on Friday (Feb. 11), Clarkson took on the track “Double Take” by Dhruv.

Check out both of those below.

In other recent Clarkson news, the singer recently collaborated with country legend Dolly Parton on a new rendition of the hit, “9 to 5.”

The two have recorded a new version of the historic song as a duet and it will premiere in a new documentary at SXSW this year. The new documentary is titled, Still Working 9 to 5 and will be premiering at the South by Southwest (SXSW) Film Festival in March.

Co-director and producer of the new doc, Gary Lane, told Variety, “We could do a documentary just on the making of the duet.”

“The first iteration, Dolly’s original version was very upbeat. There was a lot of hope I would say in the song,” said co-director/producer Camille Hardman. “And this version is just a little bit melancholic, that women are still trying to get equality and it hasn’t happened yet, 42 years after this song was created.”

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